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Floating RV or Floating Campsite - Event Date: 11 Aug 2017

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py23kman View Drop Down
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    Posted: 11 Aug 2017 at 8:12pm
My PY23K is a great floating campsite. Larger boats I often refer to as floating RV's.

I am looking for feedback on why I should buy a bigger boat.

I throw all of my gear forward in the v-berth.   When I single hand, I have more than enough room.   Only problem I see with my boat is the weight at just 2500 pounds.   

Don't really want to move up to a larger boat but how much could I expect to gain? My guess is that a heavier boat would cut through the chop much easier and if I had an inboard diesel instead of an outboard, I would not cavitate when motoring in a following sea.

Outfitting it to the hilt would never make it a blue water boat but if I keep an eye on the weather and stay within 5 miles to 10 miles tops from shore, I generally can coastal cruise with confidence.

Currently, I have a mast mounted radome, a chart plotter with radar overlay, radar reflectors, a backup handheld GPS, charts, a 20 gallon drinking water tank, a porta potty, a sink with a foot pump, a Thermo DC electric ice chest, sufficient solar panels with two 90 amp hour batteries and a 9.8 Tohatsu Outboard that is well serviced and runs like a Swiss watch, totally dependable. I also have a self steering tiller system and a means to hold the tiller to lee when I tack so I can handle the sheets when I single hand.

When I say cruise, I don't mean a weekend trip. I am referring to, well let's just say, two weeks at sea where I anchor off for the night and get off the boat every other day.   I have about 300 feet of rode and about 20 feet of chain with a 13 pound Danforth anchor.   Oh yes, my sail inventory has a main sail and a 135 Genoa both having spares. Also, my whisker pole helps when I am reaching. She has only about 20 feet on the water, so 6 knots is about it.

I like the boat. Convince me to move up to a bigger boat.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote sgancarz Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Aug 2017 at 12:08pm
To me it sounds like you have everything you want.  Nobody needs to convince you, you need to have your own reasons.

The two reasons you stated are true.  Heavier boat, smoother ride and the outboard is the same issue I have with mine.  But instead of stepping up to a bigger boat, I am attempting a refit for an inboard engine.  Albeit it is not the traditional setup, but I couldn't justify the $11,000 that was quoted from Beta Marine.

One reason you didn't mention, and it might not be an issue for you, but headroom on the PY23 is quite low.

I will be eventually moving up to a bigger boat, but for now I am content with my PY26.
Stephen Gancarz
1975 PY26

Racine, WI
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Administrator Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Aug 2017 at 12:20pm
Hey Glenn, you have already made your case against moving up it seems so I doubt there will be anyone who can convince you differently based on your parameters!

As you know already I am a near 6000 hour mostly singlehanding PY26 sailor and I bought the boat because I did NOT want all the limitations you outlined in your post. An outboard cavitates not just in following seas but in any large seas and one of the reasons why I bought my boat which had been upgraded to a Yanmar 2GM20F (rated at 18HP).  It could still cavitate but the seas had to be huge before that happened!. 

So anyway, if you want a pretty much go anywhere anytime 6500 pound boat (and believe me I have been in some pretty challenging wind and seas in Galatia) that is darn right cavernous down below, you should check out a PY26.

If you want to be stuck to hugging the coast for the rest of your life, by all means, the PY23K is your boat and I won't try to convince you otherwise.
Jay Moran
Founder, The Paceship Website
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Serenity Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Aug 2017 at 1:48pm
This is my 12th sailing season with a PY23, Serenity, and its 40th year, being a 1977. For me, the boat it just fine.

The main thing I'd want to add is a dodger/spray hood. A few weeks ago a friend and I got quite saturated with cold sea water while having to motor into a steep chop made by 20-30 knot winds. Being able to keep the hatch open to gain more headroom in the galley area when it is raining would be nice too. For the table and sleeping, the lack of headroom does not bother me.

My wife, on the other hand, has pretty much refused to go anywhere since the first year. She is demanding full standing headroom throughout, and a complete galley with refrigeration and an oven. So, I mostly sail alone.

The boat is quite suitable for coastal cruising, but one does have to pay close attention to the forecasts, and have knowledge of safe harbours along the route, just in case something hits that you are not prepared for. A larger boat would be more comfortable in rough stuff, but the PY23 is not unbearable.

Many people cruise in small sailboats. For a couple of YouTube examples, check out Dylan Winter's first couple of seasons sailing aboard "The Slug" on Keep Turning Left, or Simon Carter's voyages, including trips with a family of 4, on a smaller boat than ours.

When I look at getting a bigger boat, I also consider what comes with it in terms of expenses. The price of a larger dock, winter storage, insurance, increased maintenance costs and so on may mean higher financial stress. Would it really be worth it?

So far, I have been successfully able to talk myself out of getting something larger, but I do take a peek at what is on the market from time to time. Nothing I've gone to see in person has been enough to make me part with my money, or my Serenity.

Peter

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py23kman View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote py23kman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Aug 2017 at 7:10pm
It's hard to move up especially when you've put a lot into a boat knowing that you'll get 10% back in the sales price but I think I'm leaning toward letting my PY23K Dubl O go for something between 26 to 30 feet. Yeah, I may be breaking the bank but just call me the drunkin sailor... Need a bigger and heavier boat. There's a lot of great boats out there in the 10 to 15k range less what I get for mine (good luck) I know
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